Jan. 16, 1917: The A&M basketball team defeated Southwest Conference foe Rice in Houston. As a post-victory celebration, A&M cadets stole Rice's unattended mascot, a 6-foot-tall canvas owl. The owl weighed about 200 pounds and was stuffed with sawdust, according to a January 2000 art…

Jan. 11, 1956: Texas A&M graduate Robert Earl Keen was born. The Houston native is a beloved singer-songwriter, with songs including The Road Goes On Forever, Merry Christmas From the Family, Gringo Honeymoon, Feelin' Good Again and his collaboration with his friend and fellow Aggie Lyle…

Jan. 6, 1973: Casey Fossum, class of 2000, was born. Fossum, a left-handed pitcher, was a seventh-round draft pick in 1996 for the Arizona Diamondbacks, but elected to play for the Aggies from 1997 to 1999. He was an All-American in 1998 and 1999 and led the Aggies to Big 12 titles both years.

Jan. 5, 1829: Thomas Gathright, Texas A&M's first president, was born.  A&M's Board of Directors, headed by Gov. Richard Coke, wanted former Confederate president Jefferson Davis as president of the land-grant school. Davis declined and recommended Gathright, who was superintendent o…

Jan. 2, 1922: A&M upset Centre College, 22-14, in the Dixie Classic. Sophomore E. King Gill had been on the football team as a backup running back, but left in the middle of the season to focus on basketball. At the Dixie Classic, Gill, a native of Dallas, was spotting in the press box f…

Dec. 30, 1896: Homer Norton was born. Norton coached the A&M football team from 1934 to 1947. Before coming to A&M, he coached at Centenary College in Shreveport, Louisiana, where his teams had a record of 60-19-9 from 1926 to 1933.

Dec. 29, 1990: Texas A&M defeated No. 9 Brigham Young University (and Heisman-winning quarterback Ty Detmer) in a 65-14 Holiday Bowl upset in San Diego, California. The Aggies were up by 30 points after the first half. A&M scored nine touchdowns, four by quarterback Bucky Richardson.

Dec. 23, 1887: Gibb Gilchrist, Texas A&M's 11th president, was born. Gilchrist, a graduate of the University of Texas, was state highway engineer from 1927 to 1937. He reorganized the department and restored federal highway funding. Gilchrist oversaw the establishment of the first statew…

Dec. 22, 2001: "CC," which stands for copy cat, was born at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. CC was a female domestic shorthair cat and the world's first cloned companion animal. Her DNA is an exact copy of her donor's, but the two differ in markings …

Dec. 9, 1965: Ranger, an English bulldog and pet to A&M President James Earl Rudder and his family, died following surgery for a kidney infection.  Ranger had full run of the campus and would enter classrooms, dorm rooms and the dining hall. 

Dec. 7, 1941: The Japanese bombed the naval ships and air bases at Pearl Harbor. The manager of the A&M campus movie theater shut down the film that was playing to announce the news to the audience, according to A Pictorial History of Texas A&M University by Henry Dethloff. Cadets re…

Dec. 6, 1992: Former Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel was born.  During the 2012 season, Manziel became the first redshirt freshman and second Aggie to win the Heisman Trophy. He also received the Davey O’Brien and Manning Awards, among other honors. He finished fifth in the 2013 Hei…

Dec. 3, 1957: John David Crow won the Heisman Trophy, becoming the first Aggie to earn college football's highest honor. Crow rushed for 562 yards and six touchdowns in seven games, and he recorded five passing touchdowns. On defense, Crow intercepted five passes. A&M coach Paul "Bear" B…

Dec. 2, 1984: Reveille V arrived on campus. She was the school's official mascot until 1993, when she was forced to retire after having surgery on her stomach. Reveille V died in 1999, after suffering from severe arthritis and pain.

Nov. 27, 1919: The Aggies completed the 1919 season undefeated and unscored upon (for a 275-0 point total). In 1980, the National Championship Foundation retroactively named the 1919 A&M team in a three-way tie for the national title with Harvard and Notre Dame.