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The Assembly Hall was built just before Gov. Lawrence Sullivan Ross was appointed A&M president. It was meant to be a chapel and auditorium, according to A Pictorial History of Texas A&M University, 1876-1976 by Henry Dethloff. It had seating for about 1,000 people.

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The third assembly hall built during campus' history lacked the architectural design the other buildings possessed. “New” Assembly Hall was located approximately where the All Faiths Chapel is now. The "Hollywood shacks" that housed overflow students were adjacent. Later, Puryear and Law hal…

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The second dormitory was structurally identical to Pfeuffer Hall. It was located between Fermier and Bolton halls. In a nod to Texas history, it was named for Stephen F. Austin, known as the “Father of Texas.”

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The textile engineering building was built where Harrington Education Tower is today. In 1970, the building was the first home to educational television station KAMU-TV before the broadcast station moved to the Moore Communications Center. KAMU-TV is a Public Broadcasting Service affiliate a…

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The Olympic outdoor swimming pool had platform and spring diving boards. The pool was next to DeWare Field House and Downs Natatorium. All three were demolished in the same year for the expansion of Kyle Field and construction of The Zone.

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The Chemistry and Veterinary Building featured a progression of sections, one behind the other, with three different lengths. The facade, or first section, featured a portico, or covered entryway that sticks out from the rest of the building. Six, two-story Ionic columns supported a pediment…

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The all-male dormitory was named for Pvt. Norman G. Crocker, class of 1917. Crocker was the first known Aggie to die in World War I, according to Texas Aggies Go to War: In Service of Their Country by Henry Dethloff. He was on board the Tuscania when German submarines sank it Feb. 5, 1918.

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Named for P.L. “Pinkie” Downs, class of 1906, Downs Natatorium was an indoor swimming pool. It was part of DeWare Field House, located north west of Kyle Field. The natatorium was home to A&M’s swimming and diving teams for more than 60 years, until the Student Recreation Center and Nata…

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The fourth dormitory built on campus was basically two, three-storied buildings book-ending a four-story building. The building added 55 dormitory rooms to the campus. Foster Hall had arched windows and pediments on the facade. It would have been located next to Hart Hall and across from the…

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The mess hall was named Steward's Hall until 1898. Thomas Gathright was the first president of A&M. The building was more like two buildings side-by-side, one side with three stories, the other four.

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The first dormitory in the 20th century was built to alleviate a housing problem that had resulted in overflow students living in tents since 1906. Students lived in tents until 1918. Frame buildings dubbed “Hollywood shacks” replaced the tents and were used until 1931.

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Guion Hall was an auditorium and could seat 2,500 people. The Assembly Hall built in 1889 had seats for 1,000, but it was being used as an armory by that time. According to a January 1996 issue of Texas Aggie magazine, the Guion had six columns and the exterior resembled a Roman temple. The …

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The dormitory was named for Harvey Mitchell, the “father of Brazos County.” He is credited with petitioning the state to locate the A&M campus in Brazos County. The dormitory was located roughly where Beutel Health Center is now, next to the Y.M.C.A. Building.

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The hall was the first building built solely as a dormitory. Pfeuffer Hall was located approximately between the Psychology and Academic buildings, in front of where the Biological Sciences Building – West is now.

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The dormitory was named for popular college president Lawrence Sullivan Ross. It was a red brick building with 41 rooms heated by wood burning stoves. It was located on Military Walk next to Legett Hall.

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The Serum Laboratory housed a museum from 1937 to 1965. Mark Francis, the first dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine at A&M, donated his fossil collection in 1937, creating a museum of natural history at A&M, according to A Centennial History of Texas A&M University, 1876-19…