Texas A&M will once again host its first game of the football season on a Thursday as the university announced the Aggies will play Texas State on Thursday, August 29.

The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) grant was awarded to a Texas A&M-led team that will develop a way to quickly detect which bacterial pathogens are present in a soil or water sample.

It can be difficult for rural residents to receive mental health counseling. Health care resources are scarce in rural areas, and mental health care can be even more challenging to access due to distance, availability and cost. Through the Texas A&M Telehealth Counseling Clinic, Texas A&…

By now, about 80 percent of us have long since given up on our New Year’s resolutions. However, as the warmer months approach, we might get back on the diet we abandoned to shed some pounds in time for summer. The alkaline diet—touted by the likes of athletes who have stayed in the game well

The United States has more than 5,200 hospitals with nearly 800,000 fully-staffed beds. Yet, certain hospitals struggle to keep up with the demands of their communities. It is not uncommon for hospitals or an emergency room to become full and for prospective patients to experience long waits…

A teaspoon of soil can contain as many as 1 billion bacteria, but most of them are completely harmless, or even beneficial. That also means that if someone with nefarious intentions adds dangerous bacteria to the soil, it can be difficult to sort out the good from the bad. That’s why the Def…

On March 17, 2019, a fire broke out at the International Terminals Co. (ITC) petrochemical plant in Deer Park, Texas, sending a large plume of smoke into the air and triggering multiple shelter-in-place warnings for residents in nearby communities. The chemicals released during the ITC incid…

We started the Strategic Partnerships and Initiatives at the Texas A&M University Health Science Center to serve as a central focus for community-facing projects. We brought many of our Texas A&M programs centered on improving population health across Texas into one place.  Currently…

SHow long should I stay home after being sick? Often, this question comes with an internal back and forth about whether you—or your children—should stay home or not. Whether a child or an adult, Alison Pittman, PhD, RN, CPN, CNE, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of N…

In the spring time, many people fall sick with either the common cold or seasonal allergies, and many of those symptoms overlap. Cindy Weston, DNP, RN, FNP-BC, assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Nursing, gives you tips on how to decide if you have allergies or a cold. She sa…

Vytas Bankaitis, PhD, has been awarded the Avanti Award in Lipids by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB). Bankaitis is a Distinguished Professor and the E.L. Wehner-Welch Foundation Chair in Chemistry at Texas A&M College of Medicine. Bankaitis was recogni…

A project to study the opioid epidemic and help mitigate opioid use disorder has been selected to submit final proposals in this year’s X-Grant Program. The X-Grants, an interdisciplinary research program, is part of the Texas A&M President’s Excellence Fund. The goal of the program is t…

April is national child abuse prevention month. Child abuse and neglect can happen in any family in any neighborhood, regardless of that family’s race, ethnicity or socioeconomic status. Every year, child protective services (CPS) agencies investigate approximately 2 million cases of possibl…

In a new study published in the journal Vaccine, Annette Regan, PhD, of the Texas A&M School of Public Health, and colleagues from institutions in the United States and Australia examined the effectiveness of the influenza vaccine in Australia during the 2016 Southern Hemisphere influenz…

Whether it’s deciding where to eat or what car to buy, people increasingly turn to online reviews to learn more before they make a purchase. The same applies for health care, with patients sharing their experiences with physicians, which others use to make decisions on where to seek care. Th…

Kleberg County has seen significant improvements in health care costs by collaborating with Texas A&M Healthy South Texas, a health improvement pilot program that focuses on preventive health. In 2017, Kleberg County Judge Rudy Madrid and leadership from Healthy South Texas announced the…

China is undergoing an ambitious reform of their health care system, including expanding universal health insurance coverage to 90 percent of the population as well as transforming the public hospital-based health care system into a primary care-based delivery system. As these changes are im…

Most medical students only focus on one thing—learning medicine. However, this is not the case for Ahad Azimuddin, MD Plus student with the Texas A&M College of Medicine Class of 2024. Azimuddin is wrapping up his Master of Business Administration (MBA) through the Texas A&M Mays Bus…

On April 4, Texas Governor Greg Abbott reappointed Nancy Downing, PhD, RN, SANE-A, associate professor at the Texas A&M College of Nursing, to the Texas Forensic Science Commission. Downing was one of four appointments made by the governor that day. Since 2005, the commission has provide…

New study will examine the emerging evidence that the air we breathe over our lifetimes impacts our brain health when we age. Xiaohui Xu, PhD, associate professor and department head at the Texas A&M School of Public Health, is the Texas A&M site principal investigator on a study tha…

Earlier this month, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first drug to treat postpartum depression, brexanolone, which will be marketed under the brand name Zulresso. About one out of every nine American women experience postpartum depression, according to the Ce…

Historically, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with veterans and other military personnel—it was first called “shell shock,” after all. However, PTSD is much more common throughout the population than most people think and can develop anytime a person is exposed to a…

Spring time! Flowers are blooming, and the sun is starting to come out. For many people, spring is the time of year for new beginnings and renewed energy. Carly McCord, PhD, director of Telebehavioral Health and clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Medicine, explains …

Crissie Vandehoef, an MD/PhD student at the Texas A&M College of Medicine, received a Ruth L. Kirschstein Individual Predoctoral National Research Service Award (NRSA), also known as an  F30 fellowship, from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), pa…

Despite advances in early detection and treatment, 25 percent of the deaths in the United States occur as a result of cancer. Antibody-drug conjugates, or ADCs, represent a promising treatment for cancer. An ADC is, as its name suggests, an antibody linked to a potent drug that can kill cell…

National Public Health week at Texas A&M begins April 1 with a week of engaging events, conversations and celebrations. Kick Off and Photo Contest National Public Health week will kick off with multiple events beginning at 10 a.m., Monday, April 1, when College Station Mayor Karl Mooney …

Carl Gregory, PhD, an associate professor in the Institute for Regenerative Medicine at the Texas A&M College of Medicine, is one of eight faculty members from Texas A&M University scheduled to make presentations during the inaugural President’s Excellence Fund Symposium  Thursday, A…

This year’s Match Day results showed a promising future for family medicine. According to the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), 2019 marks a full decade of year-over-year growth for family medicine in the National Resident Matching Program Main Residency Match (NRMP Match). Thank…

Every year, the Southeastern Conference (SEC) selects one faculty member from each school in the conference to receive the SEC Faculty Achievement Award. The award recognizes professors with outstanding records in research and scholarship. This year, the SEC honors Roderic I. Pettigrew, PhD,…

From annual physicals to sick visits, most people end up in their primary care provider’s office at least once a year. As you sit in the waiting room, you may begin thinking about what questions you need to ask during your appointment. Charity Karpac, MD, adjunct assistant professor at the T…

The Texas A&M School of Public Health was selected as one of two finalists for the Harrison C. Spencer Award for Outstanding Community Service. The distinguished award is presented annually by the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH) to an ASPPH-member school or p…

Texas A&M College of Medicine will play host to the 2019 Pre-JAMP and Pre-Medical Symposium April 27. The half-day symposium, which is intended for high school and college students who are interested in the field of medicine, will provide a campus tour, informational workshops, hands-on-…

New evidence from Texas A&M School of Public Health indicates that texting-while-driving laws may avert the need for emergency treatment following a motor vehicle crash. Researchers found that states with a primary texting ban on all drivers on average saw an 8 percent reduction in emerg…

Many people only think about their ear health when something goes wrong, but it’s important to proactively consider what to do to prevent pain or irritation. Do you know how to properly take care of your ears? Of your children’s ears? Katie Hepfer, DNP, C-PNP, and clinical assistant professo…

High pediatric diabetes rates near the Texas-Mexico border have lead Genny Carrillo, MD, ScD, associate professor at the Texas A&M School of Public Health, to begin work on a holistic diabetes and obesity education program for children and their families in the area she has called home f…

Scientists’ search for ways to combat obesity continues. Recently, investigators have been exploring whether they can engage the lymphatic system to help regulate obesity-induced inflammation of fat (also called adipose) tissue and restore systemic metabolic fitness. Texas A&M College of…

When Alonzo “Al” Byington ’58 knocked on a stranger’s door in 1985, he had no way of knowing that he was about to come face-to-face with his future son-in-law. Al was in the process of helping his daughter, Carrie Byington ’85, move to Houston to begin medical school. Her new next-door neigh…