1941 team

A&M had to replace quarterback Marion Pugh, running backs John Kimbrough and Bill Conatser and others from a team that went 20-1 in the previous two seasons. Still, the Aggies had firepower. In the season opener, Derace Moser and Leo Daniels combined to throw for 182 yards in a 54-0 rout of Sam Houston State. After beating A&M-Kingsville, the Aggies ran it up on NYU, 49-7. Moser and Tom Pickett both scored twice in the win. The team moved to 5-0 with shutout victories over Baylor and TCU. Against SMU, Moser ran for a touchdown, and found Marshall Spivey for two others in a 21-10 A&M win. A win over Rice moved A&M to 8-0 and 28-1 in its last 29 games. At No. 2 in the country, A&M took on No. 10 Texas with a chance to compete for a national championship. The Longhorns rolled up 418 yards against the Aggies' defense and rolled to a 23-0 victory at Kyle Field. It was the second consecutive season in which UT ended A&M's undefeated dreams. On the day before Pearl Harbor, the Aggies beat Washington State 7-0 and qualified for their second consecutive Cotton Bowl. Alabama made only one first down in the bowl game, but capitalized on a bevy of A&M mistakes in a 29-21 win. Defensive lineman Martin Ruby and running back Sam Porter took an oath of enlistment in the Naval Air Corps at halftime. A&M finished the season 9-2 and ranked No. 9. Moser won the Southwest regional vote for the Heisman Trophy, but didn’t finish in the top 10 of nationwide voting.

Derace Moser

Derace Moser won the southwest regional vote for the Heisman Trophy in 1941.

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